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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Control of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases found in the catalog.

Control of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases

D. J. Morrison

Control of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases

20-year results from the Skimikin stump removal experiment

by D. J. Morrison

  • 79 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Pacific Forestry Centre in Victoria, B.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Armillaria.,
  • Armillaria root rot.,
  • Phellinus.,
  • Roots (Botany) -- Diseases and pests.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby D.J. Morrison, G.W. Wallis and L.C. Weir.
    SeriesInformation report / Pacific Forestry Centre -- BC-X-302., Information report (Pacific Forestry Centre) -- BC-X-302.
    ContributionsWallis, G. W., Weir, L. C., Pacific Forestry Centre.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination16 p. :
    Number of Pages16
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16008900M
    ISBN 100662163656

    Armillaria, is a genus of parasitic fungi that includes the A. mellea species known as honey fungi that live on trees and woody shrubs. It includes about 10 species formerly categorized summarily as A. mellea. Armillarias are long-lived and form some of the largest living organisms in the world. The largest known organism (of the species Armillaria ostoyae) covers more than square miles (8. Managing Armillaria root rot diseases is likely best achieved with integrated approaches as all control methods have limitations [13]. Four years after treatment, Schnable and others [14], did not find that Trichoderma controlled Armillaria in a peach orchard but did show growth increases of Trichoderma treated peaches.

    Informational table showing disease name, symptoms, pathogen/cause, and management of Oak diseases. Armillaria root rot: Branches die back. A fleshy, firm, honey-colored mushroom forms annually in the autumn in groups of a few to or more in a cluster at the tree base. No control is recommended. Where trees are being readied for fall. PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT. Applicators and other handlers must wear long-sleeved shirt and long pants, chemical resistant gloves made of any waterproof material Category A (e.g. barrier laminate, butyl rubber, nitrile rubber, neoprene rubber, natural rubber, polyvinylchloride (PVC or vitron), and shoes plus socks.

    Armillaria solidipes (= Armillaria ostoyae) is the most serious root/butt rot pathogen of conifers in the western U.S. and Canada (Dettman and van der Kamp, ). It is usually associated with conifers but will also colonize hardwoods. Armillaria solidipes can be differentiated from other. Introduction. Brown root rot caused by Phellinus noxius (Corner) Cunningham, a white rot fungus, occurs in tropical and subtropical areas is a member of the family Hymenochaetaceae, order Hymenochaetales, phylum Basidiomycota of the kingdom Fungi. When grown in potato dextrose agar (PDA), it forms colonies that are initially white to yellowish brown and with age .


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Control of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases by D. J. Morrison Download PDF EPUB FB2

Control of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases: year results from the Skimikin stump removal experiment Author: D J Morrison ; G W Wallis ; L C Weir ; Pacific Forestry Centre. After seedlings became established, the principal causes of mortality were the root diseases caused by Armillaria ostoyae and P.

weirii. Cumulative percent mortality of Douglas-fir by A. ostoyae and P. weirii and of lodgepole pine by A. ostoyae was less in the treated block than in the untreated block. The Skimikin experiment was established in in British Columbia to determine the efficacy of inoculum removal for control of Phellinus weirii.

Half of a ha tract in a mature Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga Control of Armillaria and Phellinus root diseases book pine (Pinus contorta) stand in which % if stems had been killed or infected by Phellinus weirii was whole-tree logged and root raked to remove most roots larger Cited by: Armillaria root disease to be managed.

Tables 1 and 2 will help identify the mode of Armillaria root disease in your forest. Root Disease Resistant Species The most widely used and successful approach to controlling Armillaria root disease damage is through the use of disease tolerant.

Control of laminated and Armillaria root diseases by stump removal and tree species mixtures: amount and cause of mortality and impact on yi eld after 40 years.

Armillaria root rot is a disease that decays the root system of many common trees and shrubs. It is caused by several species of Armillaria, fungi that can be recognized by the clusters of yellow to honey-colored mushrooms that emerge during moist conditions.

The disease is often lethal, and infected trees may have wilting branches, branch dieback. The incidence of Armillaria root disease was recorded during routine measurement of a silvicultural experiment designed to test the effect of thinning and nitrogen fertilizer application on the growth of karri regenerated after clearfelling.

The experiment was established inwhen the stand was year-old. Ten years after thinning, the level of disease increased significantly with. SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS. Roots infected with Armillaria mellea have white to yellowish, fan-shaped mycelial mats between the bark and the wood.

Dark brown to black rhizomorphs sometimes can be seen on the root surface. All stone fruit rootstocks are susceptible sometimes to Armillaria root rot. Armillaria root rot can infect many deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs. Trees infected with Armillaria root rot have decayed roots and lower trunk.

These trees often break or fall over in storms. A tree care professional should inspect trees with Armillaria root rot to determine if the tree is a hazard. Armillaria root rot symptoms can by sly, starting out slowly with slowed growth and culminating with wood rot and mortality.

Recognizing the disease and implementing a process of Armillaria root rot control can slow the disease. More information can be found here.

Cause Coniferiporia weirii (formerly Phellinus weirii), a fungus (may also be called P. sulphurascens in some reports). This native root pathogen is often Fir, Douglas and True-Laminated Root Rot | Pacific Northwest Pest Management Handbooks.

Phellinus. Therefore the correct generic placement of both P. weirii and P. sulphurascens is Inonotus. Beginning in Sturrock and associates adopted the use of Phellinus sulphurascens to refer to the Douglas-fir form (Sturrock and othersLim and others ).

This is the binomial I will use in the present document. Laminated root rot. Armillaria root rot occurs naturally in the majority of the United States and the Great Lakes region and is caused by a number of fungi in the genus include A. ostoyae, A. mellea, A. gallica, A. calvescens and A.

sinapina, all of which have been documented in the Great Lakes region. Common names for these fungi and their associated disease include honey stumper, honey. Armillaria root disease, also known as shoestring root rot, is an often lethal disease of tree and shrub roots and lower stems.

It can affect almost any conifer or hardwood species, from seedling to maturity. Trees and shrubs stressed due to drought or defoliation can be particularly susceptible to Armillaria root disease. Where does Armillaria. Detection, Recognition and Management of Armillaria and Phellinus Root Diseases in the Southern Interior of British Columbia: Author(s) or contact(s): D.J.

Morrison, H. Merler, and D. Norris Source: Research Branch Subject: Root Disease Series: FRDA Report Other details: Published Hardcopy is. Evaluating Root Disease Hazard. The potential threat posed by root disease varies across British Columbia. The decision to apply a root disease treatment is based on an assessment of the future risk from root disease and the overall management objectives for the site.

Reviewing which pathogens may be present is the first step. Armillaria root rot is a fungal root rot caused by several different members of the genus symptoms are variable depending on the host infected, ranging from stunted leaves to chlorotic needles and dieback of twigs and branches.

However, all infected hosts display symptoms characteristic of being infected by a white rotting most effective ways of management focus on. Root diseases can be minimized by keeping trees vigorous and avoiding wounds in the root system and near the base of the tree.

Once a tree has become infected it is difficult to control a root disease. A thorough examination of the root system near the trunk is needed to determine the extent of the infection (see Chap Disease Diagnosis).

In severe cases where most of the roots are dead or the trunk. Armillaria spp. Summary Laminated root rot (LRR) is the most damaging disease of young-growth Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Pacific Northwest.

Laminated root rot is caused by the fungus, Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gilb., which survives for 50 years or more in roots after infected Douglas-fir are harvested. Successive. Armillaria root disease (Armillaria ostoyae) has been reported since the early s in the coastal area (western sector), but its incidence over the last 20 years has increased in the eastern sector.

Root disease is a factor in determining species to favor in stocking control measures done to accelerate development of late-successional character.

Many plantations with root disease–susceptible species planted in areas of high P. weirii inoculum are now part of the Late Successional Reserve network. This will result in large areas where the.Assessment of armillaria root disease infection in stands in south-central British Columbia with varying levels of overstory retention, with and without pushover logging.

William K. Chapman, a Bruce Schellenberg, b Teresa A. Newsome a.Cultural management of Armillaria root rot (ARR).This is by far the most effective approach compared to chemical or biological options. Several studies have demonstrated that partial excavation of the crown of trees to expose primary roots to air and solar heating (collar excavation) can reduce Armillaria colonization and prolong the productivity of infected fruit trees.